Woman who welcomed IVF baby after 16 years writes book on her journey to motherhood

A British woman who suffered 18 miscarriages and endured 26 years of fertility treatment has written a book on her experience

Louise Warneford, 52, welcomed her little, a son called William, four years ago, and has spent that time relishing her role as a mother.

She decided to write a book to give other women hope that becoming a mother can also be their reality.

She told Yahoo sports that she met her husband, Mark, in 1999 and married. Mark, 58, had two daughters from a previous marriage, and underwent a vasectomy, believing he would not extend his family further.

Following a consultation with a fertility specialist, the couple was told their best route was Intrauterine Insemination (IUI) using donor sperm

Three months later the couple were delighted to discover Louise was pregnant

But at the three-month scan, they were devastated to be told there was no heartbeat.

“The sonographer said she was going to get a second opinion,” Louise said. “The consultant came in and said ‘I’m sorry, I’m afraid your baby has died.'”

They decided to take a break from treatment and began trying again six months later with renewed hope that it may work on the second attempt

Louise fell pregnant again, but again she suffered a miscarriage soon after.

After a third miscarriage, Louise was referred to Saint Mary’s Hospital, which specialised in recurrent miscarriages.

Despite extensive investigations, doctors could not find a reason for the miscarriages.

Louise said: “It almost made it worse because if they could find something they could treat it, but if nothing is showing up they don’t know what to treat.”

Having suffered several more miscarriages, even trying donor embryos, they made the heartbreaking decision to end their journey to become parents.

“There was something wrong as my body kept on rejecting the pregnancies.”

Louise was left wondering why and began to research recurrent miscarriages. She soon discovered a book on Natural Killer Cells, a condition where the body attacks an embryo.

“I just really wanted to know why I couldn’t carry to full term,” she explained. “It was what I thought about when I woke up in the morning when I went to bed, I was constantly wondering why.”

Louise decided to visit a specialist in maternal medicine, Dr. Hassan Shehata, to try and find out why she kept miscarrying

On discovering Dr. Shehata’s success rate was between 85 and 90 percent, Louise’s mind started to wonder if she could try just one more time.

“At this point, I just wanted to know what was wrong with me,” she said. “But the success rate planted a seed and I couldn’t let it go.”

The couple decided to go for it

They traveled to Gynem Clinic, in Prague, for embryo donation.

Louise discovered she was pregnant just weeks later, aged 48, but could not allow herself to truly believe it until she reached 34 weeks.

“I remember the first scan to detect a heartbeat,” she recalls. “Lying on this bed with my eyes squeezed shut, holding on to the side of the bed so tightly, I was just so scared.”

She refused to buy anything for the baby and also turned down a joint baby shower with a colleague for fear it would jinx the pregnancy.

Louise clung to a conversation with her midwife who told her that if she made it to 28 weeks the baby would have a good chance of survival

“I anxiously ticked off the days on the calendar.”

William Oliver Warneford was born weighing 4llbs 15 oz via planned caesarian section.

“The past 16 years had built up to that very moment, I could not believe I was finally holding my baby.”

Louise decided to write a book on her experience after hundreds of women contacted her about her journey

“I wanted to give hope to other women who were thinking about giving up,” she said.

The book, called Baby Dreams, is available on Amazon priced at £8.99.

Have you had a similar experience? Email us your story, claire@ivfbabble.com

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